How to Write a Book: Everything You Need to Know in 20 Steps (Part 3)

Part 9. Eliminate distractions to stay focused

by Jerry Jenkins

Are you as easily distracted as I am? Have you found yourself writing a sentence and then checking your email? Writing another and checking Facebook? Getting caught up in the come-ons for pictures of the 10 Sea Monsters You Wouldn’t Believe Actually Exist?

Then you just have to check out that precious video from a talk show where the dad surprises the family by returning from the war. That leads to more and more of the same. Once I’m in, my writing is forgotten, and all of a sudden the day has gotten away from me. Continue reading

Bobbie’s Bill of Writes # 4 in a series: A WRITING PLACE

by Bobbie Christmas

I devoted an entire chapter to my Bill of Writes for writers in my seven-award-winning book on creative writing titled Write In Style: How to Use Your Computer to Improve Your Writing. Special to SPAWN, I have agreed to list and explain each item in my Bill of Writes through a series of articles. Below is number four in my Bill of Writes. Watch for the remaining items in future newsletters.

Continue reading

How to Write a Book: Everything You Need to Know in 20 Steps (Part 2)

4. Settle on your BIG idea

by Jerry Jenkins

To be book-worthy, your idea has to be killer.

You need to write something about which you’re passionate—something that gets you up in the morning, draws you to the keyboard, and keeps you there. It should excite not only you, but also anyone you tell about it.

I can’t overstate the importance of this. Continue reading

Bobbie’s Bill of Writes #3 in a series TIME ALONE

by Bobbie Christmas

I devoted an entire chapter to my Bill of Writes for writers in my seven-award-winning book on creative writing titled Write In Style: How to Use Your Computer to Improve Your Writing. Special to SPAWN, I have agreed to list and explain each item in my Bill of Writes through a series of articles. Below is number three in my Bill of Writes. Watch for the remaining items in future newsletters.

You Have the Right to Spend Time Alone Practicing Your Craft

No one lives in isolation. You have many demands on your time. Parents, siblings, significant others, even animals and friends make demands on you. In addition, you probably must spend time at work, school, and/or fulfilling other obligations, as well as spending time traveling to and from work, school, and other obligations. You must wash your clothes, clean your abode, feed yourself and your family, exercise, and even relax or meditate. You are not alone in wondering when you will ever find time to write, especially when the people you love want to spend time with you. Continue reading

How to Write a Book: Everything You Need to Know in 20 Steps

by Jerry Jenkins
(Serialized)

Part One: Before You Begin

You’ll never regret—in fact, you’ll thank yourself later for—investing the time necessary to prepare for such a monumental task.

You wouldn’t set out to cut down a huge grove of trees with only an axe. You’d need a chain saw—perhaps more than one. Something to keep them sharp. Enough fuel to keep them running.

You get the picture. Don’t shortcut this foundational part of the process. Continue reading

Clearing the Clutter

by Barbara Florio Graham

As a busy writer, consultant, and mentor, my office is cluttered with files. I’m often dealing with many different clients at the same time, and I’m a compulsive collector of newspaper and magazine articles that might be fodder for my regular columns or a future article.

Drowning in paper is a real threat!

I’ve developed a system that works for me, and I’ve also adapted this to my email. Continue reading

Bobbie’s Bill of Writes

by Bobbie Christmas

When I speak to writers, at times I sense their angst. Some feel embarrassed to admit they are writers, as if being a writer were a disease best left undisclosed.

We writers must believe in ourselves, or who will believe in us? We must take pride in our work. We must demand the respect that is rightfully ours. No longer should we be reluctant to admit we are writers. An old Talmudic saying goes, “If I’m not for me, who will be?”

Some folks think they can’t call themselves writers until they sell or publish something. How can they sell or publish their work, though, until they first write it? How can they write it, without being writers? You do not need to be published or paid before you receive validation. To be a writer, you need only to write.

In my book on creative writing, titled Write In Style: How to Use Your Computer to Improve Your Writing, I devote one chapter to what I call my Bill of Writes for writers. If you don’t feel worthy to call yourself a writer or to demand what you need to become an accomplished writer, my Bill of Writes is for you. Continue reading